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Author Topic: An Interview with James L Edwards  (Read 6026 times)

Offline pathetic_waste

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An Interview with James L Edwards
« on: August 01, 2014, 06:07:40 PM »
An Interview with James L Edwards
By: Pathetic Waste


James L Edwards has worked on over 17 low-budget horror films in his 20+ years in the genre. He was there for the rise and fall of Tempe Video. He has worked with The Campbell Brothers. He was also a writer for cult magazine Alternative Cinema. He's been an actor, a writer and a producer. Today, I had the pleasure to catch up with him. In the following interview we cover nearly ever detail of his illustrious career. 


PW: The first film you worked on was JR Bookwalter's The Dead Next Door (1988). Can you tell us how you got involved with the production? What was it like to be part of Akron's first zombie epic? Did you ever get to meet Sam Raimi, who financed the picture?

James: I first got involved in THE DEAD NEXT DOOR by answering an ad in my local newspaper looking for zombie extras. At the time, I had no interest in acting or writing. I actually wanted to be a special effects make-up artist. I was a Fangoria kid and people like Tom Savini and Rick Baker were my idols. Unfortunately, I had no artistic talent whatsoever and came into the audition with 6 poorly shot Polaroid pictures of me covered in fake blood and pumpkin guts. I was 12 years old at the time and was fortunate enough that Bookwalter and company took a chance with me, hiring me as an assistant to effects artist David Barton. Within weeks, they realized I was in way over my head. Instead of firing me, the moved me as production assistant and I ended up staying with the company throughout the next 15 years working as actor, writer, producer, set designer and rotoscope artist, right up to the point of Bookwalter briefly moving to California.

I always joke that THE DEAD NEXT DOOR was my own personal Woodstock. I was there at such a young age and surrounded by so many things that a 12 year old really had no business being a part of. It was amazing. I couldn't have asked for a better learning environment. Where I may not be a fan of the finished product, I am eternally grateful to have gotten my start there. I was a really phenomenal experience. At the time, it was really unheard of for a movie to be made in the Akron area and it's incredible how much help and cooperation we got from the community. I don't know if you could do that in this day and age.

To my knowledge, Sam Raimi was only on the set one day and I was fortunate enough to meet him. I remember being nervous as hell and not knowing how to approach him. Even though he had only at that time directed THE EVIL DEAD and CRIMEWAVE, I loved both films and he was the first actual director I had ever met. I had remembered reading that he was a big Three Stooges and slapstick fun in general , so I went up to him and started acting overtly nervous and stammering, just being goofy in general, again easy to do when you are a 12 year old fanboy. He cracked up and ended up being extremely personable and genuine.



PW: You went from a production assistant and small role in The Dead Next Door to a heavily featured role in JR Bookwalter's follow-up feature Robot Ninja, where you play the role of Sculley. What did you think of the film at the time? Were you excited to step-up to a featured role?

James: At the time, we were just thrilled to have a finished movie out on the market. At the time THE DEAD NEXT DOOR was still either on a very limited release through Electro Video or in distribution limbo, I can't remember which. In between shooting TDND and J.R. announcing that we were making another movie, I had started acting in a few local short films and caught the acting bug. I had also had a failed attempt at writing, directing and acting in my own film entitled LEFT FOR DEAD that sadly was completely filmed but never edited. Mostly at that time, J.R., Dave Lange, Bill Morrison and myself were just hanging out at my parents house watching horror movies and coming up with ideas. I was excited to get the chance to act in a feature.
 


PW: Robot Ninja has gained a heavy cult following over the last few years, mainly through the VHS collecting community. What do you think of it's new found fandom? Is at surprise?

James: It's shocking to me because truthfully, it's not a very good movie! I mean, it's gory as hell and has some fun bits, but for the most part it's pretty difficult to sit through. I remember we shot both ROBOT NINJA and SKINNED ALIVE back to back using short ends, unused film stock from previous productions, from the TV show THE WONDER YEARS and it was the first time we had worked with 16mm(DND was shot in Super 8 and reportedly the most expensive film after produced in that format). I do think that Scott Spiegel, Ken Hall, Linnea Quigley and David Decotea's cameos are really funny. At the time, I was collecting movie memorabilia and the extended fingernails I wear as the Sculley Demon were actually worn by Stephen Geoffrey in 976-EVIL that I donated to the making of the film. Boy, do I regret that.


PW: You have a small role in Jon Killough's Skinned Alive. Which has also gained a cult-following over the years. Were you on the set a lot? What was Scott Spigel like? Did you have an off screen role in the production?

James: I was actually only on the set of SKINNED ALIVE for one day and I didn't work with Killough at all. I believe Michael Tolochco shot my scene. It was my first movie stunt and I got hurt on it. Nothing major, just took a bug visor to the nuts. I actually believe I had some kind of injury on every Tempe movie I worked on.

I didn't really get the chance to work with Scott Spiegel on SKINNED ALIVE, but hung out with him quite a bit on THE DEAD NEXT DOOR. He was maniacally funny and always pulling pranks. I remember during his return to Ohio for reshoots on DND, I had seen that he had arrived on the set and went over to greet him. All of the sudden he yelled out "Think fast!!!" and threw a hammer at me. I frantically ducked out of the way, only to discover that it was a foam hammer. He was always "on".




PW: After Skinned Alive, Tempe started to produce SOV films for the Cinema Home Video label, owned by David DeCoteau. The first of these was Zombie Cop, where you return as Sculley. Tell us a little about your experience with this film.

James: Again, another movie that I was only on the set for one night to film my scene. I remember being really annoyed because for some reason J.R. was adamant about not having any language in the first couple of Cinema Home Video titles. I don't know if it was something that he worked out with David DeCoteau or just J.R. being weird. Well, that said, it gave the dialogue a silly, unnatural feel. Now, I'm not claiming to be some kind of amazing actor or anything, but I challenge Robert De Niro to deliver the line "Jeez, Buddy, Jeez. I just get excited" and not look bad.


PW: Tempe continued to push out product for Cinema Home Video. In 1992, they produced four films. Humanoids From Atlantis, Maximum Impact, Galaxy of the Dinosaurs and Chickboxer. You play a role in all four of them. What was the production like on these films? Which one of these was your favorite at the time? Did you ever meet David DeCoteau?

James: Production was very quick and extremely on the cheap on those. I'm pretty sure I got paid in Scream Queens trading cards and Cannibal Holocaust soundtracks - items Tempe was selling at the time. The movies were actually sold overseas and the VHS sleeves printed before they were ever produced. We would receive a box and synopsis from Dave and told "Go make a movie". As an actor, it was fun, but quickly lost it's charm once the movies were edited and we released the quality of movies we were making. There were supposed to be two more CHV titles that were requested, but never produced - a western and and a blaxploitation flick. I remember J.R. talking to Dave and asking him "How in the hell am I supposed to make a western with these budgets?" DeCoteau's response was "Just get James Edwards out on a horse and get it done."I only had the chance to meet Dave once during a stay in California. He had invited J.R., Dave Wagner and myself to dinner. He was incredibly nice and had a lot of really great production and business insight.

If I had to pick my favorite CHV title of that time, I would have to say Maximum Impact. It's severely flawed, but I had some good times on that one. Worst would be Chickboxer. It was a horrible experience all the way around and a painfully bad movie to boot.




PW: In 1995, Tempe stepped it up a bit, with the release of Ozone. You have a large role in the film as Sam DeBartolo - The Drug Lord / Spikes. I know, you also played a big part in the promotion of the picture. After the Cinema Home Video films, this seems like a breath of fresh air. A lot higher production value and more stylized filmmaking. Did this film give you a new following in the indy scene? Did this film push Tempe to new places? What was it like being in the heavy make-up and prosthetics?

James: I think that OZONE was a chance for Tempe to start making movies that they wanted to see rather than becoming a no-budget factory studio. Between the larger budget, ambitious script and stronger morale, we were attempting to prove ourselves as filmmakers rather than kids with video cameras.  Where OZONE didn't really do anything to build a following for myself in the indy scene, that really didn't come along until Alternative Cinema magazine, Polymorph and Bloodletting, it did make people take notice of Tempe and predominantly Bookwalter.

I think I was asked to play the role of the Drug Lord specifically because I was used to performing under prosthetic effects. During the 80's I was a guinea pig for many Tempe effects artists such as Dave Barton, Dave Lange, Bill Morrison and Arvin Clay. Because of this experience, it was known that I would be not only comfortable in the makeup but more importantly be able able to act in it. The Drug Lord suit was heavy as hell and literally the only thing not covered in prosthetics was my legs. I remember doing the final battle scene with James Black. James, who was an amazing actor, was also a bit too psychical when asked to do an action scene. I know during the shooting of OZONE, he accidentally bashed Bill Morrison in the head with a door during his death scene and had accidentally punch Tom Hoover in the face during a scene in GALAXY OF THE DINOSAURS. So I guess, it was my turn because during the shooting of the ending, he was supposed to to knock a knife out of my hand, punch me in the face and force a bomb into my stomach. During one of the takes, he actually connected a pretty sizable punch to my eye. Thankfully, there was so much foam in the headpiece of the suit, he didn't knock me on my ass, but the punch knocked the adhesive from the eyepiece of the mask. It was boiling hot on the set and under the suit it was even hotter. When the adhesive broke loose, a stream of sweat ran down my face. Between that and the sting of the punch, I thought he shattered by eye. Fun times.



PW: I know you were a writer for Alternative Cinema. How did the magazine come about, how did you get involved and what effect did it have on the independent scene at the time?

James: That actually started as a little fanzine/leaflet that J.R. used to do as The B's Nest. It was mostly shameless promotion, but a few issues in I got the chance to be head reviewer and piss a ton of filmmakers and actors off with my shitty reviews. This is why I never get upset by bad reviews of my stuff. I kinda deserve it with all the horrible things I've said about other filmmakers. I loved working on the magazine because it gave me a voice and actually built up a bit of a fanbase because of that obxious voice.



PW: After Ozone, you stepped up to handling two roles, one on camera and one off camera. You acted in and produced The Sandman (1995) Were you ready to step-up to a role as a produce? Did you learn a lot about filmmaking by stepping behind the camera?

James: No, I don't think at the time I was ready to step up as producer, but I also think J.R. had no business directing a movie at that time either. He was going through a divorce. I was a wreck from a break up of a long term relationship. It was not the time to do a movie. And with THE SANDMAN it was complete excess. This should have been a little movie, but instead the budget was out of control, everyone had their own agenda and we we out of our element in a town we never should have been in. J.R. was convinced that his movies needed "seasoned actors", so he not only cast through a talent agency but hired a talent scout to co-produce with me. The problem with that is that all of the actors had to be paid much more than what we had in the past and, because most of the talent had a theater or extra background, the movies performances feel like a stage play. Due to a fight between J.R. and I, I was actually banned from the set for three days. I didn't go to the premiere. The first time I had seen the film in it's entirety was during the recording of the commentary that J.R. and I did. Definitely the worst film experience I've ever had.


PW: The Sandman was also the first time you worked with long-time co-star Ariauna Albright. You two had a lot of chemistery in your films. What was it like working with her? Did you two click right away? Are you two still in touch today?

James: Actually, I didn't get the chance to work with Ariauna until we shot I'VE KILLED BEFORE, the short film that became BLOODLETTING. Ari didn't arrive on THE SANDMAN until after post production and at that point my work was done. Ari and I always had a weird love/ hate relationship where either we were best of friends or mortal enemies. The thing I loved about Ari was that she had a true passion for the genre and really threw herself into the characters she played. I really think we had incredible onscreen chemistry, something I still get fanmail about to this day. I always hoped that we would become the no-budget Paul Bartel and Mary Woronov, but sadly it never came to be. We still keep in touch and often threaten to do a movie together, so I guess only time will tell.


PW: Also in 1995, you starred in and produced the short that would later become the film Bloodletting. Matthew Jason Walsh's I've Killed Before. What was your relationship with Matt and do you two stay in contact? Was it exciting to work with a new up-and-coming director? Did you know the short would later become a feature, was that always the intention, or was it suppose to be a one-off?

James: Matt and I have been friends for years, so the idea of working with him as director really excited me. He had come to me with a script and basically told me "This is what I picture if you were a serial killer". The idea of playing someone similar to myself, but also a sociopath really intriged me. I've always been fascinated with serial killers, so I jumped at the chance to play one. I believe the intention was always to make I'VE KILLED BEFORE feature length, but unfortunately after the well documented hell that was making the short, it took several years to convince us to go forward with it. The whole reason both the short and the feature were made is that we were hungry to do another film while J.R. was in a hibernation period. For all it's woes, it's still one of my favorite projects that I've worked on. Matt and I have lost touch as of late, but I'm sure if either of us contacted the other, we would be ready to go on another one.


PW: In 1996, you had your first role as writer, with Polymorph. How did you go from actor to screewriter? Was the transition easy for you?

James: I had been working as a writer for Alternative Cinema and Blackest Heart and really enjoyed myself. At that time, I had written two screenplays. A killers on the lamb movie called FUGITIVES: A LOVE STORY and a horror anthology called THE RETURNERS. J.R. was getting ready to get back in the directors chair and I wanted a chance to prove myself as a writer. In a stack of unproduced projects, he had written a seven page treatment for POLYMORPH. After reading it, I asked if I could take a crack at writing the screenplay. He agreed and I locked myself in a room for two weeks and cranked out a script pretty much to spec of the treatment. Ariauna read through it and had a ton of complaints. I had asked if I could take another shot at it using my own ideas and J.R. was open to that. After another two week period, POLYMORPH went from a chemical creature/ crazed cannibal redneck killing kids in the woods movie to a gangsters and interns vs. aliens movie. The script itself is pretty much the same as I wrote it minus the ending which had to be changed for budgetary reasons.

http://youtu.be/HbyogLCDAu4?list=UU6oey4BC5u3iIVJ6G-daS0Q

PW: You also star in Polymorph, as Ted, once again with Ariauna Albright. What was it like tackling what was arguably your biggest role to date? Did the film turn out how you intended during the writing process?

James: J.R. and company were shocked when I told them I wanted to play Ted. They assumed because of my past roles that I was going to end up playing Carlos. I just wanted the chance to do something out of character. I had mostly been playing scumbags and bad guys through most of my "career". This would give me the chance to show that I was taking acting seriously. It's still my second favorite film I've worked on and for the most part, turned out the way I wanted it to.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2014, 10:21:59 PM by pathetic_waste »

Offline pathetic_waste

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2014, 06:08:52 PM »

PW: After Polymorph, you had what is now your most recoginzable and remembered role as Butch Harolw in Matthew Jason Walsh's Bloodletting. A feature version of the earlier short, I've Killed Before. Can you tell us a little bit about how this feature came to fruition and the production? Were you excited to take on a first-billing role? Many say this is the role you were born to play, do you feel the same? Can you tell us a bit about the infamous baby scene?

James: BLOODLETTING is still my favorite film and role I've ever been involved with. I think Matt's screenplay was incredible. I do believe that it was the role I was born to play because again this was how Matt pictured me as a serial killer. Yes, we've all heard the stories about how horrible it was making the movies, but this was finally a movie that I was in that I would personally watch if I wasn't involved in it. I remember our main goal with BLOODLETTING was to make a serial killer love story and in the process try to offend as many people as well could. Originally, before the surprise ending was up into place, the opening was to have me getting picked by an elderly couple while hitchhiking and later have me wake up with their naked, bloody bodies in bed with me. The baby scene that everyone loves also was originally going to have a 12 year old son that I shotgun to death but I'm so glad we didn't go that route. It would have been just too much.



PW: In 1998, you wrote the film Psycho Sisters. Which was directed by Pete Jacelone. Tell us how you became the screenwriter. And in your opinion how did the film turned out, from script to screen?

James: It's funny, the reason I got that gig was because I had trashed Pete's original PSYCHO SISTERS movie in the pages of ALTERNATIVE CINEMA. He had contacted me shortly after the review came out and asked if we could talk about the review. I wasn't pissed, he just wanted to know what could have made it better. After our discussion, he asked if I'd be willing to "put my money where my mouth is" and rewrite his screenplay for the remake, which I agreed with. I ended up adding a lot of my own characters and scenes. My only regret is that I had written scenes for Ari and I to make an appearance and because of my big, stupid mouth I wasn't allowed to do the movie. Appearantly, I had said some offensive things about two lead actresses in the film and they threatened to walk if I showed on set. Oh well, can't make everyone happy.

http://youtu.be/CKgk61LVLX8?list=UU6oey4BC5u3iIVJ6G-daS0Q

PW: You took a hiatus after Bloodletting and Psycho Sisters. You did later return to work with The Campbell Brothers. You did three films for them. The first being The Red Skulls, followed by Cordoba Nights and Poison Sweethearts. How did you get involved with the Campbells and what was it like working with them? Which film did you have the most fun doing with the Campbells?

James: I was taking a break to get married, get divorced and get married again. At the time, I was managing a CD/DVD store in Cuyahoga Falls, OH. One day, a couple of kids in their 20's walked in and recognized me from BLOODLETTING. They explained that they made movies in Kent, OH and would I be interested in acting again. I said yes and they said "Oh good. We don't know any old dudes.". They ended up being the Campbell brothers. The thing about the Campbells as apposed to other sets I had been on, is there is a real family atmosphere there. I remember coming back for CORDOBA NIGHTS and everyone was so welcoming. That was the most fun I had on one of their sets because not only did I get to work with the Compound Picture family again, I got the chance to work with Pulp Fiction star Duane Whitaker, who I was a fan of since I saw his film EDDIE PRESSLEY in the 90's. He was great to work with and we did a lot of fun ad-libbing.


PW: In 2008, you acted and produced the found footage film June 9, Directed by T. Michael Conway. Was it a big step to get back into the producer's chair?

James: I actually had pretty much about given up on making movies at that point. I was working two jobs, working on my second marriage had a baby and one on the way. I just figured the movie thing was something I would tell the grandkids about. I had met T. Michael Conway on the set of an action film that I had done with KILLER NERD director Wayne Harrold. Conway was the cinematographer and after the shoot we kept in touch. Conway had shot a gritty cop drama called PIG and was getting ready to do a reality horror film called JUNE 9 and asked me to take a look at it. I liked the script and had a couple of suggestions that he was keen on and before I knew it, I was offered to come along as producer. It's gotten some great reviews and it's beautifully shot for a film of it's kind. I'm happy to have been a part of it.


PW: Your last film to date is the Joe Ostrica film The Spookshow, where you play the role of Marshall. How did you get involved with Old School Sinema and what was the production like?

James: That was just a complete fucking party. Joe and his team are just incredible as far as the amount of work they get done on a single day. I got the chance to work with Ricky Lee Leonard again from the Campbells' films and he's always great company and an amazing artist. Besides, who could possibly complain about shooting a horror movie in one room and a photo shoot with incredibly hot goth girls in the other. I really look forward to working with Old School Sinema in the future.


PW: What movie are you asked to sign the most?

James: Sadly, the movie I get asked to signed the most is CLERKS. Half the people I run into at conventions think I'm Brian O'Halleran. In fact I even signed a couple of CLERKS DVD's just for fun. That story got back to O'Halleran and he had such a great sense of humor about it he sent me a 8x10 of him that he signed "James L. Edwards". It's one of my prized possessions.

PW: Do you think it was easier to get your indy film seen in the days of VHS, than it is today?

James: I think it's easier to get it seen but near impossible to make money off of it. The internet is a double edged sword. For me, it's gotten me in touch with a number of fans that I would normally have no idea they had even seen my films. 


PW: Out of all your films, what is your personal favorite? And what is your least favorite?

James: I love BLOODLETTING. Again, it's the type of film that I would want to watch if I didn't make movies. The least favorite would have to be CHICKBOXER. Just bad all the way around.

PW: What are your favorite splatter films?

James: I love BRAINDEAD, PIECES, HELL OF THE LIVING DEAD, NIGHTMARE CITY, DEMONS and one of my favorites DELLAMORTE DELLAMORE. More recent would be THE SIGNAL and the HATCHET films. Adam Green can do no wrong in my book.

PW: What is your favorite horror film, of all time?

James: That would be a toss up between TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE and DAWN OF THE DEAD. Depends which day you ask me .


PW: Will we ever see your return to film?

James: I sure hope so. I'd love the chance to get back into it. I'd really like to be the no budget DICK MILLER, where I could just come in, do a memorable cameo, and go home. Of course if the right lead came up, I'd be down for that too. The problem is that so many indy projects just fall through in pre-production. Via Facebook or email, I usually get offered about 3 or 4 films a year. Well, I haven't done a movie since 2010 with THE SPOOK SHOW, so that tells me how my luck has been.


PW: It was recently announced that 88 films will be releasing The Dead Next Door on blu-ray. What are your thoughts? Which of your other films, would you like to see make the transition to HD?

James: I'm in total shock. I better get a freebie. And then they can do BLOODLETTING, OZONE and POLYMORPH and give me freebies of those as well. Pretty please, with sugar on top.

PW: Anything you would like to share with your fans?

James: Contrary to popular belief, it is not better to deposit your seed in the belly of a whore than it is to spill it on the sands of time.

http://youtu.be/k4dEVlkOybw?list=UU6oey4BC5u3iIVJ6G-daS0Q

Offline splat

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2014, 06:51:46 PM »
Too awesome, thanks for sharing with us : )

Offline woodenheart

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2014, 06:54:38 PM »
This is wonderful...

May I link this to our Review&Interview FaceBook?

Offline pathetic_waste

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2014, 06:55:48 PM »
This is wonderful...

May I link this to our Review&Interview FaceBook?

Sure. Not a problem. There will be more to come! :)

Offline splat

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2014, 07:02:55 PM »
Nice!!!

Offline pathetic_waste

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2014, 07:04:06 PM »
This IS exclusive to EHC! Thank you for welcoming me with open arms.

Offline woodenheart

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2014, 07:06:29 PM »

Offline pathetic_waste

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2014, 07:16:55 PM »
No I do not. No facebook. Just twitter.

Offline woodenheart

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2014, 07:40:26 PM »
No I do not. No facebook. Just twitter.

Already following you on Twitter.. ;)

Offline pathetic_waste

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Re: An Interview with James L Edwards
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2014, 08:17:41 PM »
Likewise! :)

Offline pathetic_waste

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