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Author Topic: The Battery {2012}  (Read 24612 times)

Offline woodenheart

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2013, 04:00:02 AM »
ChristianStella joined, hes the cinematographer for this film.....fuck yeah.

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2013, 09:25:15 AM »
OMG!!! That is fucking awesome news like OMG!!!

Welcome to our awesome site Christian : )

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2013, 04:28:02 PM »
This does look good!
"a chill runs up your spine til you scream" = The Misfits

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2013, 09:22:01 PM »
It's more than good Rip...you should go check this one out...seriously hope they do get the chance to release it on DVD / Blu-ray...they should start a Indiegogo / Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for this if they need to do it themselves....I for one would buy it that is for certain!

Offline Dave

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2013, 08:52:36 PM »
I just watched this and it blew me away. Fantastic film!

I'll do a write-up soon.



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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2013, 11:13:14 PM »
I just watched this and it blew me away. Fantastic film!

I'll do a write-up soon.


Awesome.  :)

Offline Visitor Q

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2013, 07:05:41 AM »
FUCK THIS MOVIE, FUCK THIS MOVIE, FUCK IT, FUCK IT....

I can't remember the last time I've been this pissed off over a film. At first I was unsure what was going to come of this film after I started it, but some small complaints aside I was invested and fully enjoying this movie. I was really impressed bywhat the writer/director had accomplished on such a small budget. But then, but then the movie becomes one the most painful, grueling, unwatchable pieces of shit I've ever bared witness to. What sort sadistic asshole director forces the viewer to sit through 27 MINUTES, 27 MINUTES of two dick heads in a car doing nothing, do fucking nothing. This final scene is boring and headache inducing. I'm 37 fucking years old, I've been a movie buff since I was a child. I've seen thousands and thousands of films and I can honestly say I've never come across anything like this... I'm just speechless. Horrible film, just horrible.  >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:(

Edit: I just noticed the Cinematographer is a member here. Props to you sir, in all honesty the cinematography is easily some of the best I've seen in a low/no budget film. Beautiful my friend. But 27 MINUTES in the back of car? What the hell was the director thinking? Edit the ending down by 20 minutes and the movie will be fantastic. 27 Minutes....
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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2013, 07:41:58 AM »
Personally I liked the ending and didn't even notice how long it went for  :gum:

Offline woodenheart

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2013, 09:18:52 AM »
I thought the ending was amazing....27 minutes in the privacy of two average friends, people, guys, alone, probally gonna die.....what they did.... It was awesome watch.  :straight: What the fuck were they suppose to do?!?, exactly what they did. I'm glad to have seen that part. I felt like I was with them on the journey.


This film was perfect.

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #24 on: June 22, 2013, 09:20:22 AM »
I thought the ending was amazing....27 minutes in the privacy of two average friends, people, guys, alone, probally gonna die.....what they did.... It was awesome watch.  :straight: What the fuck were they suppose to do?!?, exactly what they did. I'm glad to have seen that part. I felt like I was with them on the journey.


This film was perfect.

So well said!

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2013, 02:52:38 PM »
I thought the ending was amazing....27 minutes in the privacy of two average friends, people, guys, alone, probally gonna die.....what they did.... It was awesome watch.  :straight: What the fuck were they suppose to do?!?, exactly what they did. I'm glad to have seen that part. I felt like I was with them on the journey.


This film was perfect.

Did the director really need to 27mins to establish this aspect of the film? No, he didn't. Your average sitcom tells complete stories in less time if remove the commercials.Hell The Twilight Zone established new characters and told complete stories in less time. The director could have got same effect if he had cut this scene by 15 or 20 mins. As it is the movie has 100min running time. Releasing a 80min movie is more then acceptable. As it stands this ruines what is one of the best Zombie films I've seen in years. The final scene is redundant and brings a great buddy road film to a screeching halt and kills any momentum going into the final act. As it stands the third act of this film is unwatchable IMO. I seriously want to take the leads gun and put it in my own mouth to put myself out the misery this movie was putting me through. :)
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Offline Dave

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #26 on: July 01, 2013, 09:16:58 AM »
Christian Stella posted this on the film's IMDB page recently...

"There is an idea for The Orchard, which would be a sequel to The Battery that can also stand alone as its own film, so that we can grow the audience, rather than limiting it to only people who saw The Battery. It would start where The Battery left off, I'm just saying you don't need to know the full backstory to enjoy it. Don't know if or when that will happen, as we really want to spin another genre into something new."

Fingers crossed this comes to fruition.:yay:

EDIT: Shut up, Visitor! Those 27 minutes are fantastic. :P

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #27 on: July 01, 2013, 04:14:01 PM »
That's great news Dave, hope it happens.

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #28 on: July 01, 2013, 08:33:15 PM »


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Quote
Charging The Battery: Interview with Jeremy Gardner
Posted by Nick Jobe
About a week and a half ago, I had the pleasure of watching an independent zombie drama called The Battery. In a time where every other movie involves zombies, especially in the low budget world, itís a pleasant surprise when you not only get one thatís good, but one of the best. Itís a film that doesnít follow a typical zombie movie formula, both structurally and cinematically. Not to mention it looks really good despite having been made for a mere $6,000 dollars.

I was so impressed with the film that, within 30 minutes, I had made contact with the filmís cinematographer, Christian Stella, who put me in contact with the filmís director/writer/co-star, Jeremy Gardner, for an interview. I emailed him some questions, and he returned with some amazing and detailed answers. So what follows is the full interview, where we discuss everything from inspirations to behind-the-scenes stories and the music of the film.


NJ: I wanted to start by saying Iíve seen far too many zombie films to count over the years, and this was by far one of the best Iíve seen. With the inundation of zombie films these days, what made you want to make this one?

JG: Strangely enough the first movie to stick zombies in my craw was Night of the Living Dead. But not the original classic, the Tom Savini color remake with Tony Todd. That was the first zombie movie I saw, as a kid, randomly one night on HBO, and I had never seen a scarier monster. There was something so methodical and relentless about zombies that really shook me up. So ever since, I guess you could say I was hooked, even though I can count the zombie movies that I truly LOVE on one hand. Itís a great genre bursting at the seams with mostly shit. I wanted to make a movie about the way two very different people dealt with a zombie apocalypse on an intimate and personal level. I hadnít seen it done that way.

NJ: Thereís a lot of argument these days over slow vs. fast zombies. When putting this film together, was there ever any discussion, or did you know from the start it was going to be traditional and slow?

JG: They were always going to be slow. I have nothing against fast zombiesĖ28 Days Later is one of my favorites, and I quite enjoyed Snyderís Dawn remakeĖbut zombies, to me, have always represented a slow, creeping mortality. Death is coming, slowly but surely, you know itís coming, there is nothing you can do about it. That hopelessness is terrifying to me. Once they chase you like a lion, then everything is kinetic reaction and adrenaline and it takes the fear of inevitability out of it. I also thought it would be interesting to imagine that people were just used to them. That if there were one lumbering across the field toward you, you could finish your conversation without having to worry about it. Itís the difference between a bee and a swarm of bees. That idea that they arenít a real problem until you do something stupid and allow yourself to be surrounded or trapped was always interesting as well. So, slow slow slow, for me. Always.

NJ: Thereís a memorable moment where one of the characters decides toÖ pleasure himself during a rather awkward situation. Itís not an idea you generally see in films like these. When you were writing that scene, was it more of a ďHey, this is something you never seeĒ or was it honestly to show just how desperate for a woman he was?

JG: The original incarnation of that scene was far more brutal and it would have made Mickeyís character far less sympathetic, but the gist of both scenes were the same. I donít think you can ever write thinking, ďIím going to write something new, or crazy or shockingĒ just for the sake of it. On the other hand, after I wrote it, I likened it to the ear-cutting scene in Reservoir Dogs. Not because it was even remotely as clever and skillfully done, but because I thought it had that same kind of creepy/catharsis for the audience. It starts funny, then gets weird and creepy and uncomfortable, and then there is a big laugh relief when itís finally over.  That scene actually came about very organically from Mickeyís character. He hadnít seen a woman in months, and weíve established, between the picture he keeps of his ex-girlfriend to his obsessing over Annie, that female companionship is probably the thing he misses and craves most of all. So that moment seemed a perfect physical manifestation of how desperate and lonely he is. Also, in earlier drafts of the script, Mickey was much more vocal about his sexual peccadilloes, was always telling sex stories. As those were pared away to make him a little more likable, the masturbation scene stayed.

NJ: Iím a big fan of long takes, and your film utilizes many of them. Itís not a technique you often see in low budget or zombie films. Was there any particular inspiration for the style?

JG: Well, this might seem obvious, but Iím a huge Alfonso Cuaron fan. Children of Men is one of my favorite movies. The things he does in a single take are feats of choreography, planning and just plain fucking magic. Our single takes are more akin, I imagine, to something like Jarmuschís  Stranger Than Paradise. Now, to be honest, I havenít even seen Stranger than Paradise, but I had read once about how he basically just locked the camera off and let the scenes unfold in front of it. That always stuck with me as an antidote to all the fast-paced chop chop editing that is so prevalent now. If everything else about our movie was going to be the antithesis to other zombie moviesĖitís green instead of grey, itís slow instead of fast, thereís not a lot of goreĖthen I thought it should be framed and unfold in a different way as well. Plus one big recurring motif in the movie is the idea of having to wait with the characters. I very much liked the idea that because these characters have nowhere to be, time is more languid and nebulous. The audience is forced to sit with them as mundane things play out. We have to watch Mickey change the batteries in his Walkman, we have to watch the guys brush their teeth, and finally we have to watch a character wait to find out the fate of the other. Waiting, to me, is terrifying. I always liken it to a diagnosis scene in a movie. Typically it would go something like this: CUT TO: Doctor: ďYou have cancer.Ē To me, the far more terrifying way to shoot it is to have to watch the person sit in the goddamn waiting room. Just sitting there while other patients are called in and the news drones on on TV, pretending to read a magazine. Waiting is tension building. Itís probably another reason I love baseball so much. There is time to breathe between each pitch. To wonder whatís going to happen. It isnít constantly moving like other sports.

NJ: Long takes are difficult as is, because you generally have so much going on. But here, the long takes are more about the emotion and atmosphere of the scenes. How difficult was it to film these scenes? Was it emotionally draining (like Benís waiting and anxiety in the car near the end)? And did you have to start takes over often?

JG: They were difficult from a technical standpointĖour sound guy always wanted to kill me. But honestly once youíve run through it a few times then it just becomes about nailing it. Thereís no coverage to get, which is both terrifying and freeing. A funny thing, about Ben waiting in the car. I really wanted that scene to drag out. I wanted it to be six or seven minutes long. I thought, that will really be almost unbearable. The only way to give the audience a sense of what Ben is feeling is to make them feel stuck with him. So, the cueóand this is a bit of a SPOILERó for Adamís character to come back into the car, was going to be when I put my cigarette out. The sound guy would wave and he would come back. But I forgot to put the fucking cigarette out, so the scene stretched to something like eleven minutes. It was such an exhausting scene, emotionally, and we were shooting on a road, that we only did the really long take twice. I wish I could have done it ten, twelve times and wrung myself out, but after two takes and all the screaming and cigarettes, my voice was shot. We ended up using the first take too. So here I am thinking that Iím going to be really ballsy and shoot that static shot for seven minutes and I accidentally let it run eleven. I still havenít watched that scene all the way through with a festival audience, it makes me too uncomfortable.

NJ: I read that the characters were named after famous mice characters. But was there any conscious connection to the fact Ben is also the main characterís name in Night of the Living Dead?

JG: Of course I know that Ben is the name of the lead from NOTLD, but I hadnít seen that film in years when I wrote it. It must have been subconscious. I think more probable is that I was looking for an alliterative name that sounded like a baseball player name. One of my favorite players is the catcher for the Atlanta Braves Brian McCann. That the character ends up being called Benjamin McBride is no coincidence. Also, the famous mouse thing: No fucking idea where that came from. A random IMDB person put those together and posted that trivia. I had absolutely no idea that all four names were famous mice. Thatís not even subconscious because I donít know the famous Annie mouse. Itís funny as hell though.

NJ: Music itself is almost a character in the film, as the character of Mickey uses it as an escape. Did you know the kind of soundtrack you wanted going into the film or did that come together in Post?

JG: The music pretty much reflects my personal tastes. Which also happens, I think, to work well with the overall tone of the film. I have been a huge fan of Canadian folk rock outfit Rock Plaza Central for years, and early on in pre-production we toured the locations and cut together a little video with one of their songs and posted it to twitter. Shortly after, the lead singer Chris Eaton saw it and contacted us to ask if we intended to use the music in the movie as well. It was a moment ofÖ ďOh shit, CAN we use the music in the movie?Ē He was very interested and generous and got us in touch with the record label who held the rights and it started up a little working relationship online. One night after shooting all day, I had a few beers and worked the nerve to email and ask if he would be willing to record a cover of the classic Claude Ely song Ainít No Grave, and he did. So that cover that plays during the opening credits was recorded specifically for the film. I canít explain how amazing it is to go from a fan of someoneís work, to collaborating with them. It is a surreal experience. And he didnít stop there. He put us in touch with Jen and Eric from We Are Jeneric/The Parlor and they graciously contributed two songs. Christian, my D.P., knew some of the guys from Sun Hotel and they offered up their music, and he happened to see a band opening for them one night, El Cantador, and they gave us pick of the litter as well. Adam, my co-star, knew Wise Blood from college and he let us use three of his songs in the film. I really loved his music because it was so different from the rest of the music in the movie, this really lovely, upbeat kind of swooningly romantic electronic music. When I hit upon the idea to have his song playing the moment the movie starts it was one of those real eureka moments. It is such a contrast to the scene. A serene, overgrown pastural shot juxtaposed with this thumping electro-pop. I thought it was so great for the character of Mickey.

Music really was a binding agent for the story, the motif of Mickeyís headphones carries through all the way to the end so I always wanted songs to score those scenes. We hit a little resistance from some bands that arenít in the film; they couldnít understand how it would be beneficial to them to just give their music away. And I can understand that, but I canít stress enough how generous the artists who did contribute were. One of the first questions we get from nearly everyone who sees the film is about the music, and that makes me really happy. They are all incredible bands who deserves success and new fans and recognition. I actually got a text from Eric of the Parlor last week telling me there has been a big uptick in sales of their music since the film was released, and Chris Eaton said the bandís fans on Facebook had been stagnant for a long while and now they are steadily climbing again. I love it. Everyone needs to buy their music. Supporting those artists makes the chance they took on our little movie worthwhile for them in retrospect, and supports the notion that independent artists across different disciplines collaborating and helping each other is a good and necessary part of the process.

NJ: You act as writer, director, and co-star of the film. If you had to choose, which position do you like most and why? And which is the most difficult?

JG: I was always an actor and writer first. The directing gig came from basically being the one person who was with the story the longest and had a specific feel for how it should look. Iíll be the first to admit Iím nearly inept when it comes to the technical aspect of filmmaking, so directing, in the sense that I did it, was probably the easiest part. But only because I was lucky enough to have my great friend of nearly fifteen years and right-hand man Christian Stella in my corner. I trust him implicitly which is crucial when youíre also acting. I know if he says ďwe got itĒ that we got it, or if he says we need to do it again, we do. Directing is really two things; conveying what you want to your team, and then delegating and trusting them to help you realize it. I say this scene needs to look like this and they figure out how to do it.

The acting wasnít nearly the challenge it should have been because I knew every line of the script front to back before we ever even decided to make the damn thing. But also because we had such a small crew and such a short schedule I didnít have time to be fussy about my performance. If we had had more time, or I wasnít wearing the directorís hat too, there might have been a little more nuance to my performance. For better or worse, thereís a lot of me in Benís performance because I just didnít have time to craft a more subtle or specific character.

And writing, well, shit, what to say about writing. Iím not the first to say it, but writing is ninety percent frustration and agony peppered with moments of pure euphoric inspiration. And those little moments where you realize youíve just created something special out of arranging thoughts in your head and writing them down fuel the weeks of banging your head against the keyboard. BUT, writing is also the only one of the three that no one can stop me from doing. Itís a solitary, lonely pursuit, but really rewarding.

So to answer your question: Writing is the most difficult, acting is the most fun. But I want to do them all.

NJ: What was the most memorable moment you can share of something that happened while filming the movie?

JG: Oh boy, well, Iíll just rattle some off real quick: The day we test-fired the .44 Magnum replica for the first time, a cop showed up in the middle of the woods two minutes later and had his hand on his holster because I had a gun in my hand. That was terrifying, but it turned out they were actually responding to call that a naked man jumped into Henry Kissingerís pool and they were looking for him. The cops ended up being really nice and yelling ďRedRumĒ and ďDonít go into the woodsĒ over the loudspeaker as they drove away.

Also, the first day of three filming on the road where the movie ends, the Volvoís engine exploded. Like, plumes of smoke and belching oil, completely destroyed. It was so lucky that it happened there though, we just asked a local resident if we could push it into their driveway and each day of filming we would go put it in neutral and roll it back down the road to film in. It was crazy.

NJ: Finally, we keep hearing throughout the film that The Orchard is not what you think it is. Any clues on what was actually going on there, or is that being saved for a potential sequel?

JG: No clues. I donít even know if I have a clue. I know basic details but I think I almost put that line in there so if I ever did write the sequel it would be a signpost to remind me not to write something expected. It was a future challenge for myself to make The Orchard something different than The Walking DeadĎs Woodbury or any other classic, cliche safe haven. Iíd love to make The Orchard, but that will be driven entirely by whether the audience wants it. It would be crazy to go headlong into a sequel to a movie maybe not a lot of people see. I guess weíll see how this one plays out.

NJ: Thank you for your time!

JG: Thank you sir!


I found the link to this article from Your Face! http://www.yourfaceisa.com/charging-the-battery-interview-with-jeremy-gardner/ on Facebook. Felt quite a few people would be very interested in reading it.

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Re: The Battery {2012}
« Reply #29 on: July 01, 2013, 08:34:49 PM »
It's awesome that this was made for only $6000.00, just shows what can be done for so little...well compared to the more mainstream companies anyway.